Verizon, TWC, and Comcast to Play “Copyright Cop” for the RIAA

Money -- either direct payments from the RIAA or the suggestion of bigger profits via serving less bandwidth -- has convinced the ISPs to turn on their filesharing customers. 

The crackdown begins in July, ISPs hope for bigger profits by serving less bandwidth

If you’re a customer of Time Warner Cable (TWC), Comcast Corp. (CMCSA), or Verizon Wireless, a joint venture between Verizon Communications Inc. (VZ) and Vodafone Group Plc. (LON:VOD), and you happen to also be a pirate of copyrighted content, you may soon find yourself warned or even have your service terminated.

Of course not all ISPs are likely onboard.  Implementation of the scheme will likely be expensive, though it may yield a net payoff, depending on how well it works at discouraging piracy.  Smaller ISPs — such as municipal Wi-Fi, small carriers, and other players — may find it infeasible to adopt a similar scheme.  After all, Comcast, TWC, and Verizon are some of the biggest ISPs in America.

Ultimately the RIAA’s goal, though, will be to try to force (via lobbying the government) all ISPs to join the effort, regardless of financial feasibility.  This ultimately represents a big financial risk to small ISPs, as the current atmosphere in Washington D.C. is very pro-RIAA, thanks to their generous bribes campaign contributions.
The RIAA and MPAA are selling them on the promise of reduced bandwidth and higher profits.  However, the ISPs should beware this deal with the devil — if they botch their new job as “copyright cops”, it could cost them dearly.

Source: CNET

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s